Your Time to Write, Part 2

Continued from “Your Time to Write, Part 1”

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“I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.”
Shakespeare, Richard II, Act V, Scene V

Legendary Alabama football coach Bear Bryant kept a plaque on his office wall that read, “What have you traded for what God has given you today?”

I think of that question at the end of every day. I remind myself that God has given me the gift of 86,400 seconds that day. Once I’ve spent that portion of my life, it’s gone. What did I get in return? Did I spend those seconds wisely?

With these questions in mind, here are four more time management principles to launch you toward your writing goals:

Third, make time and space to write even if you don’t have the time or space. There’s no “later.” There’s no “when I get around to it.” There’s no “when I have more time.” There’s only now. If you don’t write now, as busy as you are, you won’t ever write. Writers don’t “get time” to write or “find time” to write. They make time to write.

Heed the wisdom of Stephen Koch, author of the Modern Library Writer’s Workshop: “You don’t have time? Make that time. This is essential. Only you can make and defend the time you need for your work. Nobody is going to give it to you. …  You must make time or you will not write at all. Simple as that. And be warned: For every writer, at every level of fame and productivity, making and defending writing time is a lifelong battle. It’s not just hard now. It will always be hard.”

Every writer needs a creative space. It doesn’t need to be a plush office overlooking the seashore. In fact, you’re better off without such distractions. As a writer, your job is not to look out the window, but to look within. A desk, a chair, a computer, and you’re set.

Your creative space does not have to be in your home. I have a successful writer friend who writes his novels in a coffee shop. But that’s not for me. I do most of my writing by speaking into a microphone attached to my computer. I don’t like people overhearing me while I write, so I work at home, in my modest-yet-comfortable office, with the doors closed. Works for me. Do whatever works for you.

Make an appointment with yourself. Be on time and be prepared to work. Even if you only have fifteen minutes a day to write, make sure you’re there promptly, and make each of those minutes count. Photographer Chuck Close said, “Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration; the rest of us just get up and go to work.”

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Fourth, put an end to excuses. People have all kinds of excuses for not writing. I’ve found that most people become successful around the same time they stop making excuses. Screenwriter J. Michael Straczynski believes many writers spend too much time and energy “finding excuses for not being what they are capable of being, and not enough energy putting themselves on the line, growing out of the past, and getting on with their lives.”

No one’s standing over you to make you write. Your motivation must come entirely from within. You’ve got to want to write more than you want all the things that keep you from writing. If you procrastinate, you’ll have nothing to show for all your years on earth but a list of excuses.

Life is made up of choices, and every choice we make has consequences. Make the right choices, and you can have a successful and enjoyable writing career. But you have to be deliberate in the choices you make. If you don’t make careful, thoughtful choices about how you spend your time, other people will make those choices for you. To have a successful and rewarding writing career, you must spend your life pursuing your own goals, not doing what other people expect of you. 

As motivational speaker Michael Altshuler once said, “The bad news is time flies. The good news is you’re the pilot.”

Fifth, beware of “displacement activities.” A displacement activity is behavior that takes the place of writing. We engage in displacement activity when we feel anxious and conflicted — for example, when we want to write at the same time we feel we can’t write because we are blocked or we simply lack the energy to write.

The state of wanting to write while feeling unable to write is unresolvable — so we displace our anxiety through a different activity. Instead of writing, we raid the fridge, surf the Internet, update our Facebook status, tidy up the desk, answer emails, play computer games, and on and on. If our displacement activity is more-or-less writing-related (such as “research”), our anxiety level goes down. We know we’re not writing, but hey, it’s kinda like writing, so we don’t feel so bad about it.

Some writers, unfortunately, use drinking or drug abuse as their displacement activity. Writers who medicate their anxiety with mind-altering substances usually end up wasting their talent.

If you are aware of the things you do to displace your anxiety, you’ll be empowered to control your displacement behavior. Instead of compulsive eating or web surfing, get up, move and stretch, and grab a cup of tea or coffee. Give your Muse a chance to catch her breath — then get right back to your writing.

Sixth, write in overdrive. To write brilliantly, write quickly. I call the process of writing quickly, under the control of the unconscious Muse, “writing in overdrive.” When writing in overdrive, you don’t think. You don’t analyze or criticize or second-guess your work. You simply create. You maintain a state of passion and enthusiasm for your story, and you are carried along by a process of unconscious inspiration. This state is called being “in flow” or “in the zone.”

Most great writers have experienced writing in overdrive. John Steinbeck spoke of writing “freely and as rapidly as possible” in a “flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.” And Charles Baxter, author of First Light and The Soul Thief, told an interviewer, “The spell comes upon me, I’m in its grip. The book develops with my collaboration or unconscious help, and sometimes it proceeds even in the face of my refusal to work on it.”

To make the most of your writing time, discover the power of writing in overdrive. Learn to write freely, quickly, and without inhibition, tapping into that incredibly powerful source of inspiration, the Muse or unconscious mind.


For more insight on how to write faster, write freely, and write brilliantly, read my other books for writers:

WritingOverdrive-Medium350x550     

Discover the uninhibited creative power to write faster and more brilliantly than ever before. Read Writing in Overdrive: Write Faster, Write Freely, Write Brilliantly by Jim Denney, Kindle edition $3.99. [Trade paperback edition $7.75]

MuseOfFire-Medium350x550And for a 90-day supply of inspirational and motivational writing insight, read Muse of Fire: 90 Days of Inspiration for Writers by Jim Denney, Kindle edition $2.99. [Trade paperback edition $14.95]

Discover how to conquer the eight most common writing fears. Read cover-1writefearlesslyjdWrite Fearlessly! Conquer Fear, Eliminate Self-Doubt, Write with Confidence by Jim Denney, Kindle edition $3.99. [Trade paperback edition $7.99.]

These books are designed to motivate you, get you writing with confidence and enthusiasm, and propel you toward your goals and dreams.

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