Tag: Time

How to Put More Time in Your Life, Part 2

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Boost Your Productivity with the Grab 15 Principle

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Adapted from Answers to Satisfy the Soul: Clear, Straight Answers to 20 of Life’s Most Important Questions by Jim Denney


In Part 1, we looked at how to put more time in our lives through organizing our priorities. Now in Part 2, we’ll look at a concept that I believe is going to revolutionize your writing life and speed you to your writing goals: The Grab 15 Principle. But first, we’ll look at how to keep your writing time safe and sacred from intrusions by other people:


Second: Don’t let other people hijack your time. You have a right to set your own agenda for success in life. Others will try to entice you or even bully you into setting your priorities aside so you can meet their priorities. They’ll use guilt and manipulation to pull you away from your goals. Don’t let them.

As J. K. Rowling observed, “The funny thing is that, although writing has been my actual job for several years now, I still seem to have to fight for time in which to do it. Some people do not seem to grasp that I still have to sit down in peace and write the books.”

When someone asks you to take on a task, immediately decide (1) whether it is something you choose to do or not, and (2) what priority this task should have (if any) on your Things to Do list. If you agree to take on that person’s task, put in the appropriate category — Priority 1, 2, or 3 — and accomplish it according to the priority it deserves. Just because someone is clamoring the loudest doesn’t mean his wishes should be your command.

It’s okay to say “no” without making excuses or offering any reasons. It’s okay to say, “This is my time, and I choose to spend it another way.” You don’t have to make up a lie or justify yourself. You don’t owe anyone an explanation. Most people will respect your polite-but-firm refusal — and if they don’t, that’s their problem.

People will chew up your writing time if you let them. They’ll phone you or knock on your door and refuse to hang up or leave. When that happens to me, I find it helps to be polite but direct. I say, “I’m on a deadline,” or, “I’m short of time right now,” or, “I have to hang up now, my appendix just burst.” A good friend of mine simply says, “I’m going to hang up now.” If you want to be diplomatic about it, you can say, “I’m glad you called, let’s do this again real soon.”

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Third: Follow the Grab 15 Principle. I learned this principle years ago while partnering on books with Bert Decker and Dru Scott Decker. Bert is the author of You’ve Got to Be Believed to Be Heard and founder of Decker Communications, Inc. His wife, Dru, is a popular business speaker and author of such books as Stress That Motivates and Women as Winners. Dru originated the Grab 15 Principle, and Bert and Dru both promote it in their writing and speaking. It has changed my life by putting hundreds of extra hours into my schedule.

Here’s how it works:

You’ve got a project you want to accomplish, but your schedule is so full that you just don’t have the time. It might be that book you want to write, the exercise program you want to start, the new language you want to master. You’re saving this project for that mythical “someday” when you have “more time” — which, of course, will never happen.

But, thanks to the Grab 15 Principle, it can happen. Most of us are unaware of how much priceless, irreplaceable time slips through our fingers like sand through an hourglass. The Grab 15 Principle salvages that time and uses it to make our dreams come true. This principle is amazingly easy to follow and incredibly powerful:

First, select the project you wish to accomplish.

Next, make a commitment to “grab fifteen” minutes every day without fail to work on it. Come rain or come shine, come hell or high tide, you will devote a minimum of fifteen minutes of every day to your dream. Promise yourself that your head won’t hit the pillow until you’ve done your Grab 15.

Sounds too easy, right? But there are a number of good reasons why this principle works.

First reason: All those fifteen-minute snippets of time quickly add up. Let me ask you this: What could you do with an extra 78 hours a year? Because even if you take Sundays off and only “Grab 15” six days a week, that works out to 90 minutes per week — or 78 hours a year. That is time that would otherwise just fall through the cracks. You’ve magically, effortlessly added the equivalent of almost two 40-hour work weeks to your life.

Second reason: The Grab 15 Principle boosts your creativity, concentration, and retention. This is especially important if you are writing a novel or play. The Grab 15 Principle keeps your head in the game. Every day, you’ll spend at least fifteen minutes concentrating on your project. This provides reinforcement and continuity from day to day.

Without Grab 15, you’d be starting from scratch every few months or years, whenever you happen to get around to your project. You’d lose tons of time just saying to yourself, “Now, where was I?”

With Grab 15, you never lose your place, never lose your momentum. You remain focused on your goal day after day, so ideas and insights come to you in the shower, on your commute, and while you exercise, because your project is never far from your thoughts. This magnifies the effectiveness of each fifteen-minute session.

Third reason: The Grab 15 Principle keeps you disciplined. It imposes a daily requirement and keeps you moving steadily toward your goal. It creates a daily habit in your life that soon becomes hard to break. If you go a day without keeping your promise to yourself, you really miss it — and you make sure to get back on track the next day.

Fourth and most important reason: You find it hard to stop at fifteen minutes. You put in your fifteen minutes and discover you’re on a roll, and you just keep going. That’s even more bonus time to carry you toward your goals.

I use the Grab 15 Principle every day. This idea works.

Spend your life doing what counts

Dru Scott told me the story of her friend, Margaret. At age forty-two, after suffering a series of unexplained headaches, Margaret went to the doctor. The doctors diagnosed her with an advanced and inoperable brain tumor. She had one week to live.

Margaret’s husband phoned Dru with the shattering news. Dru had seen Margaret only days before, and she had seemed healthy and vital. Margaret had a happy marriage, a rewarding career, two fine sons, and everything to live for. Why did she have to die? And why so cruelly and suddenly?

Two days before Margaret’s death, Dru talked to her on the phone. Though the pain medication slowed Margaret’s speech, it could not quench her spirit. “For some reason, during these past six months,” Margaret said, “I’ve been thinking a lot about how I spend my time. I always thought of myself as career-oriented, but lately I’ve realized that my family is the most important thing in my life. These past few months, even though I had no idea I was about to die, I’ve spent much more time with David and the boys.”

When Margaret said that, Dru recalled her last visit in Margaret’s home. “I should feel guilty about that mess,” Margaret had said, pointing to a messy desk in one corner, “but there are a lot of things more important than a clean desk. Lately, I’ve been concentrating on more important things — on my husband and my boys, on building family memories. It’s so much easier to face what I am facing now because I’ve spent my time doing what really counts.”

Are you and I spending our time doing what really counts? Or are we just “killing time”? Let’s use the gift of this present moment to do the things that matter.

How to Put More Time in Your Life, Part 1

Not a Moment to Waste

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Adapted from Answers to Satisfy the Soul: Clear, Straight Answers to 20 of Life’s Most Important Questions by Jim Denney

People say time is money. I say time is life.

When you pick up a paycheck, you are making a life-and-death transaction. You are trading a chunk of your life, your finite mortal existence, for a medium of exchange called “money.” Over the span of your lifetime, you will have only a certain number of heartbeats, a certain number of seconds, a certain number of years. When they’re gone, they’re gone.

Ever hear someone say, “I’m just killing time”? What are they really saying? “I’m killing myself.” Because time is all you have, and when it’s gone, you’re dead. When you kill time, you kill yourself, moment by moment, second by second, a little bit at a time.

“People with a keen sense of the preciousness of time are a valuable resource,” my friend Pat Williams once told me. “They are the leaders, the go-getters, the entrepreneurial spirits. They’re the people you can count on to get the job done. People who understand the value of one tick of the clock are the ones who make the world a better place.”

Pat, the co-founder of the Orlando Magic NBA franchise, offers this basketball analogy. “In our game,” he said, “time is everything. You’ve got four twelve-minute quarters to get the job done — forty-eight minutes to shoot more baskets than the other guy. As soon as the ball is inbounded, the shot clock starts ticking. You’ve got just twenty-four seconds to shoot, or the ball turns over. And you don’t have the luxury of taking a nice, leisurely shot. Usually, you’re double-teamed, and you’ve got to find some way to force the shot while that clock is ticking down. It’s not easy — but there’s no finer feeling in the world than beating the buzzer and making the pressure shot. It’s the same way in life.”

Time is irreplaceable, life is precious. We don’t have a moment to waste.

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The myth of “when I have more time”

I wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard someone say, “Someday, when I have more time . . .” I used to say that myself. Now I know better. I’m never going to have more time than I have right now.

People always think there’s a magical “someday” out there when they will be less busy, when there will be fewer responsibilities and demands on their time, when the pace of life will slow down to a leisurely crawl. But if you truly want to make your dreams come true, you can’t wait until “someday.” You have to do it now.

My friend Phil Brewer, a counselor and leadership trainer, told me about a trip he took to Europe in 1977. “I went to Switzerland and interviewed several writers and thinkers, including Paul Tournier, the great Swiss psychiatrist,” he told me. “And there is one statement Dr. Tournier made that had a profound impact on my life.

“He said, ‘People are always looking for the right time and the perfect place to write, to paint, to accomplish some goal. They say, “I have to be in the mountains, I have to be on the coast, everything must be just so.” But if you look at all the great achievements of history, you’ll see that they have largely been done in cold, cramped, unpicturesque conditions.’

“Those words hit me right between the eyes. It took me years to fully absorb the great truth that Dr. Tournier had given to me. I’m still absorbing it. I think he saw in me a perfectionist streak that so often keeps me from starting a project until ‘just the right moment.’ I want a cup of coffee, but I want to drink it on the beach in Maui.

“The point is this: If you’re going to write the Great American Novel, then write it. Don’t put it off until everything’s just so. Do it, and do it now.”

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Practical tips for putting more time in your day

Effective time management begins with personal responsibility. You and I are each responsible for the way we invest our time. We can’t expect anyone else to organize our schedules or remind us of our goals. You own your own day, and I own mine. You and you alone are responsible for how you invest your time — or how you squander it.

In this two-part blog post, I’ll offer some tips for magically putting more time in your day. Here’s the first one:

First: Organize and prioritize. In order to achieve your most important goals, you must prioritize your time. First order of business: Make a list. Call it a “Things To Do” list or a “Priorities” list. I keep mine on a clipboard that hangs on the wall next to my computer. Every time I think of a new priority, I add it to the list.

I break my list into three categories:

  • Priority 1. Long-range dreams and goals.
  • Priority 2. Urgencies and emergencies.
  • Priority 3. Nonessentials.

Let’s take a closer look at each of these priorities and how to manage them:

Priority 1: Long-range dreams and goals. This is the category where you list such things as that dream house you want to build or the novel you want to write — whatever it is that will take you where you want to be in life. Priority 1 items are essential, but not necessarily urgent. It’s where you put your grand dreams, your hopes for the future, the projects you want to accomplish, but which tend to get crowded out by urgencies and emergencies.

Priority 2: Urgencies and emergencies. This is the category where you list the things that need to get done right away, like preparing for that presentation at the office next week. Or renewing your driver’s license. Or filing your 1040. Or scheduling that root canal. Or cleaning out the garage so you can put your car away at night.

Priority 2 stuff doesn’t really enrich your life or move you toward your dreams and goals — but not getting your Priority 2 stuff done can really make a mess of your life. These chores may not enhance your life, but they are always urgent and necessary.

Priority 3: Nonessentials. This is where you list things that need to get done, but which are medium to low priority. Often these tasks are the smallest and most easily accomplished, like “Email Joe and Mandy” or “Take down Xmas lights” or “Call Congressman Fogbottom, give him a piece of my mind.”

Once you have your list of priorities, allocate time accordingly. If you know you have nine hours to spend today, then allocate the appropriate amount of time to each priority. You can allocate it in any way that makes sense to you. Personally, if I had nine hours to divvy up, I’d probably do it this way: Five hours to Priority 1 tasks; three hours to Priority 2 tasks; and one hour to Priority 3 tasks.

Break down big, intimidating projects into bite-size, non-threatening chunks. For example, instead of putting “Write the Great American Novel” on your list, break it down into smaller component tasks: “Outline plot,” “Write character sketches,” “Research background and setting,” “Write Chapter 1,” and so forth.

Group together activities that are logically related, and do them in batches for maximum efficiency. If you have a half dozen letters to write, write ’em in a row. Maximize effectiveness by minimizing transition time, decision time, and down time.

Don’t procrastinate. Start now. Do one thing at a time, finish it completely, then move to the next item.

Organizing your priorities is essential to putting more time in your day. A surgeon was once asked what he would do if he only had five minutes to perform an operation to save a patient’s life. His reply: “I’d spend the first two minutes planning the operation.” Time spent planning and organizing your priorities is time well invested.

Continue Reading:
Part 2: Boost Your Productivity with the Grab 15 Principle